The Cancer Screening Program at the Markey Cancer Center

Markey Cancer Center pic
Markey Cancer Center
Image: ukhealthcare.uky.edu

Sherif El-Refai is a PhD student at the University of Kentucky where he studies pharmaceutical sciences with a focus on clinical and experimental therapeutics. An experienced clinical researcher, Sherif El-Refai currently serves as an oncology pharmacist at the University of Kentucky’s Markey Cancer Center.

The Markey Cancer Center is a healthcare and research institution that has been providing cancer treatment for more than two decades. The center, which is in Lexington, Kentucky, offers innovative technology and high-quality, individualized patient care provided by a team of leading cancer specialists. In addition, the center operates wellness programs such as the Cancer Screening Program.

The Cancer Screening Program operates in partnership with education programs, research groups, and healthcare providers to offer comprehensive cancer prevention and screening services. Screenings, which are free for individuals who meet eligibility requirements, are available for lung, ovarian, prostate, skin, breast, cervical, and colorectal cancers. In addition, the American Cancer Society collaborates with the Markey Cancer Center to provide recommendations related to screenings. For more information on the program, visit www.ukhealthcare.edu/markeypatients-families/cancer-screening/.

New Technology May Speed Cancer Research

Cancer Research pic
Cancer Research
Image: news.virginia.edu

In pursuit of a PhD in pharmaceutical sciences at the University of Kentucky College of Pharmacy, Sherif El-Refai also serves as an oncology pharmacist at the university’s Markey Cancer Center. As part of the Black Lab at the College of Pharmacy, Sherif El-Refai researches the ways in which gene expression affects patient responses to cancer treatments.

Under the leadership of researcher J. Julius Zhu, associate professor of pharmacology, a research team at the University of Virginia School of Medicine has created a new technique that lets scientists more quickly assess gene mutations and their effect. The technique uses lentivirus, a form of retrovirus similar to the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), which replaces normal genes with mutated versions.

The technology allows scientists to assess the effect of each mutation on the body. It is more time and cost efficient than currently available methods of studying gene mutation, and thus will be more accessible to the typical research laboratory. With this new technology, research that would have once taken 10 years will take only three months.

Dr. Zhu has suggested that this advancement will allow physicians to develop better customized treatments. By identifying the type and nature of a gene mutation, physicians may be able to suggest interventions that are likely to generate the proper level of gene activity.

University of Kentucky Cancer Screening Helps Prevent Lung Cancer

Lung Cancer pic
Lung Cancer
Image: ukhealthcare.uky.edu

A pharmaceutical sciences PhD student at the University of Kentucky (UK), Sherif El-Refai is a translational researcher focused on immuno-oncology in lung cancer at the university’s Markey Cancer Center. To compliment his oncology pharmaceutical practice, Sherif El-Refai conducts research on lung cancer treatment, prevention, and diagnosis.

Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the United States. Every year, it kills more people than colorectal, prostate, and breast cancer combined. The best way to prevent lung cancer is to stop smoking. For those who smoke regularly, lung cancer screening is recommended to detect the cancer early and to reduce the risk of lung cancer death.

UK’s lung cancer screening program was designed for persons at risk of developing lung cancer. These include seniors older than 55, people who smoke or have recently quit smoking, and people who have been smoking a pack or more fa day or over 30 years. The screening uses a computed tomography scan to reveal suspicious cancerous spots in the lungs. Patients diagnosed with the cancer are referred to the university’s Markey Cancer Center, where a multidisciplinary team of medical care givers will commence treatment.

Research Indicates Histone Protein Inhibition as Cancer Treatment

Sherif El-Refai

Sherif El-Refai focuses his work on experimental and clinical interventions. Sherif El-Refai currently works within the University of Kentucky’s Black lab, where researchers use gene expression to develop targeted cancer treatments.

In March 2017, researchers at Rockefeller University announced the development of an intervention that may reduce tumor growth by regulating gene expression. The research centers on proteins known as histones, changes to which may activate or deactivate a gene. Reader proteins within the cell then bind to the altered histone and facilitate activity of the gene.

Cancer researchers have already identified a type of reader protein known as the BET protein, which can inhibit tumor growth. The new discovery from the research team at Rockefeller University involves a type of protein that has similar potential to the BET protein but that shares a particular feature known as a YEATS domain. Like the BET protein, a protein with the YEATS domain binds to histones affected by a chemical mark known as an acetyl group.

Although the relevance of this particular functionality is as yet unknown, researchers do know that proteins with the YEATS domain may fuse with the MLL protein in certain patients with leukemia. Researchers tested this function by deleting a YEATS domain protein known as ENL from leukemia cells in mice, who had a significantly improved prognosis following the transplant of ENL-depleted proteins.

Researchers are now working on developing combination therapies that combine YEATS domain blockage with existing drugs that work as bromodomain inhibitors. The hope is to further explore the potential of YEATS domain blockers not only in leukemia but also in cancers of other types.

University of Kentucky Markey Cancer Center – Cancer Support Services

 

UK Markey Cancer Center
Image: Twitter.com

A researcher at the University of Kentucky (UK) College of Pharmacy’s Black Lab, Sherif El-Refai studies how gene expression affects a person’s response to cancer therapy. Outside of his role as a researcher, Sherif El-Refai treats patients as an oncology pharmacist at the UK Markey Cancer Center.

In addition to offering cutting-edge cancer treatment, the Markey Cancer Center provides a wide range of support services to help patients cope with both physical and emotional pain. The center’s support services include nutrition planning, psycho-oncology services to treat anxiety and depression, art therapy, support groups, and palliative care at UK HealthCare.

The Markey Cancer Center also features a Jin Shin Jyutsu program, through which practitioners use gentle touch on targeted parts of the body to restore harmony to the body’s energy system. All of the center’s cancer patients receive five free sessions with a practitioner of this ancient healing art.

Also offering integrative medicine, or complementary medicine, the Markey Cancer Center combines traditional medicine with the use of mind-body practices and natural products. The center’s integrative medicine offerings range from acupuncture and massage therapy to hypnotherapy and relaxation techniques.

To learn more about the Markey Cancer Center and its cancer support services, visit UKHealthCare.uky.edu.

The UK Markey Cancer Center – NCI-Designated

 

Vaccination and Screening Prevent Cervical Cancer

Markey Cancer Center  pic
Markey Cancer Center
Image: ukhealthcare.uky.edu

A PhD candidate at the University of Kentucky (UK), Sherif El-Refai focuses his studies on clinical and experimental therapeutics. Sherif El-Refai also works as an oncology pharmacist at UK Hospital’s Markey Cancer Center, which published an article in early 2017 advocating for vaccination and screening to prevent cervical cancer.

Markey Cancer Center offers screenings for a variety of cancers, including cervical cancer. Unfortunately, Kentucky has one of the highest rates of cervical cancer incidence and death in the United States. These are grim statistics, especially given that cervical cancer can be prevented by vaccination and regular screening.

Virtually all cervical carcinomas are caused by the human papillomavirus (HPV). At some point, most sexually active women get HPV. However, only 5 to 15 percent develop cervical pre-cancer, and even fewer develop cervical cancer. Regular use of tobacco and birth control pills, among other factors, increase the risk of developing the cancer.

The Centers for Disease Control recommends all 11- to 12-year-old girls and boys receive the HPV vaccine via two does spaced six to 12 months apart. Vaccination should be followed later in life by regular cervical cancer screenings.

Cervical cancer often does not exhibit any symptoms until its advanced stages. According to Markey Cancer Center, getting vaccinated and following up with regular screenings is the best way to prevent cervical cancer.